37 Sobek and 53 Heru

Sobek

Sobek – encircling

Two of Ancient Egypt’s warrior gods have come to bring you a message. Sobek, the crocodile-headed god who is the patron of the Ancient Egyptian Army, and Heru (or Horus) the hawk-headed god who is the ruler of this world and it’s protector. They tell you together that protecting others is both an honor and a duty. Those who train for combat are joined by all those who keep the peace in any form, whether it be the police or firefighters. You too can protect the innocent, those weaker than yourself by watching for anything that is not right. You may either alert the proper authority, or step in when you feel led to help someone who is having trouble. Being a hero is always risky, but at times is necessary for the good of all

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4 Nefer and 24 HeruWer

Heru Wer

Heru Wer

HeruWer, the elder of the gods of Ancient Egypt, brings you the hieroglyph Nefer, the symbol of all that is good and beautiful. When you are young, there are many counterfeits that can fool you as to what is good, much less what is beautiful. How you can learn to tell the difference is to watch what is the result of choosing something that seems good. Impetuous seekers of beauty will not be as rewarded as those who take their time to let the drama unfold. Is it just a mask, or is that beauty going beneath the surface where it is of real value? Patience and time will tell.

10 Djehuti and 26 Neith

Neith

Neith

Djehuti (Thoth), the Ancient Egyptian scribe of the gods, comes with Neith, the warrior goddess who is also a huntress, to tell you that research is a valuable tool for the warrior or hunter. Research can inform you of cycles, patterns of behavior, and opportunities as well as dangers. He who goes boldly into battle without knowing his enemy has a severe lesson ahead of himself. What should you research? Any blind spots that you have. When you are informed, you can make informed choices.

30 Wadj and 45 Kheper

Wadj

Wadj

Today brings two Ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs, the Wadj – a papyrus staff that signified spiritual leadership, and Kheper – the scarab beetle who symbolized a new dawn or a new birth. Taken together, the message is that the spiritual path offers each of us a new way to look at the world and our life in it. If you are burdened by life’s challenges and see no way out, the suggestion is to take a spiritual journey wherein you will find capabilities and companionship you never knew were available to you.

9 Seshat and 56 Ausar

Seshat

Seshat

Today’s gods are Seshat, the goddess of writing and measurement, and Ausar (Osiris), the father god who invented the arts of civilization, agriculture, and rulership. When you put them together, you see that the ability to keep accurate records is necessary for any organization, down to the personal level where you are being the ruler of your own life. Seshat lets you know that not only records, but accurate measurements are needed at times. Examples are making your own clothes, building kitchen cabinets, or working on your retirement plans. Ausar uses these measurements as he is making his plans and carrying them out. You have to have an accurate picture of what is in place before you can move forward on any project.

2 Djed and 21 ReHoremakhet

Djed Pillar

Djed Pillar – Stability

Today’s two cards are the hieroglyph Djed, which is a pillar signifying stability, and ReHoremAkhet, the great sphinx that guards the Giza plateau. The sphinx is a symbol of stability itself, having been on duty for thousands of years, watching over the pyramids and the land of Egypt. These two symbols of permanence are here to let you know that there are things that will last forever. One of these is your immortal soul. Your choices here in life affect the quality of your eternal life. Choose wisely, as the sphinx, and your soul, are watching. Em hotep.

39 Min and 51 Renenutet

Min - Fertility

Min – Fertility

Two gods from Ancient Egypt come to you with a message of hope. Both represent the fertile soil, which is why they are portrayed with black skin. Renenutet is the fertile soil and is shown with her child, the god of grain, upon her lap as a loving mother sustaining her child. Min, the god of male fertility, is shown with a flail in his hand to thresh the grain. Together they tell you that going from an idea to a fully developed creation takes a lot of work. The work of a mother is easily as hard as that of a farmer tilling the soil. Whatever it is that you want to create, you will start with an idea, but you will work for it to succeed.

37 Sobek and 53 Heru

Sobek

Sobek – encircling

Two of Ancient Egypt’s warrior gods have come to bring you a message. Sobek, the crocodile-headed god who is the patron of the Ancient Egyptian Army, and Heru (or Horus) the hawk-headed god who is the ruler of this world and it’s protector. They tell you together that protecting others is both an honor and a duty. Those who train for combat are joined by all those who keep the peace in any form, whether it be the police or firefighters. You too can protect the innocent, those weaker than yourself by watching for anything that is not right. You may either alert the proper authority, or step in when you feel led to help someone who is having trouble. Being a hero is always risky, but at times is necessary for the good of all.

45 Kheper and 56 Ausar (Osiris)

Kheper - Rebirth

Kheper – Rebirth

Two gods of Ancient Egypt bring you a message. Kheper, the scarab beetle that represents the new dawn and a new look at life, joins Ausar – Osiris – the creator god who founded civilization upon his gifts of agriculture and government. While Kheper permanently represents that which is new, Ausar brings us the total of tradition. Seemingly incompatible, these two must come together for the world to go on. Innovation is a necessary part of any business or country, as it is for each individual in their personal life. Make sure that you do not ignore when and how change is needed.

9 Seshat and 10 Djehuti

Seshat

Seshat

Today’s pair is concerned with writing at all levels: Seshat, the goddess of record-keeping and measurements, and Djehuti (Thoth) the god of writing. Together they let you know that there is no real separation between the sacred and the profane. Whatever you choose to record is sacred to your Source, the God of your understanding. When you know this simple truth, you will see that what appears to be daily bothersome tasks, like preparing your taxes or paying your bills, is a record of all the good that has come into your life. When your attitude is one of reverence or joy as you do these seemingly mundane tasks, you will be uplifted instead of drained.