Labor Day 2014 – Shu the god of Air

Shu, the Ancient Egyptian god of Air

Shu, the Ancient Egyptian god of Air

Shu, the Ancient Egyptian god of the element of Air, comes to you today, holding his sky over his head. He asks you to look to the sky for your limits. Whenever you feel you do not have enough power or presence to accomplish what you need to do, remember that Shu has filled you with the air you need, not only to breathe life, but also to express yourself. Be mindful of what you say and how you say it, for you are adding to Shu’s sky. Therefore, please see that your limits are set by the words you say about yourself and the world around you. The choice is yours.

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Egypt Cards to return in September

Like the little Int fish, which is the guide for the Barque of Ra, the scribe for Egypt Cards is swimming upstream. We plan to return to our postings in September and hope you will tune in. Your comments and questions are always welcome. Em hotep

Int

Int

4 Nefer and 44 Tyet

Tyet

Tyet

Today’s message comes from two glyphs: Nefer, the symbol of goodness and beauty, and Tyet, the hieroglyph that is a red sash tied into a knot, that represents childbirth. When you discover something beautiful that you had not noticed before, it is like having your eyes opened for the first time, like a new babe. Sometimes, this beauty is not something new at all, like a beautiful sunset, but the magnificence can overwhelm you with an inner joy. When you have such an experience, be sure to share it with others. At the very least, you can enter it into your journal or share a picture you take online. Remember what it is that has made your life the richer for experiencing it.

8 Seshew and 45 Kheper

08SeshewIconTwo hieroglyphs combine to bring you the message that writing can help you to create a new outlook on your life. Seshew, the writing kit of the scribe, and Kheper, the scarab that symbolizes a new dawn, tell you that when you keep a journal, you will be able to see things differently when you look at events from an impersonal viewpoint. When you keep your emotions quieted, you can hear the voice of your own spirit telling you the best way to look at something that has happened. Instead of reacting to something, you will be able to choose your best way to go into the future.

11 Anpu and 52 Bennu

Anpu - Anubis

Anpu – Anubis

Anpu, the jackal-headed god of Ancient Egypt, brings a Bennu Bird as a message that what you are seeking is a safe place. Anpu was known as the way-shower, a guide who would walk before you on the perilous journey to the Duat, the land of eternity. The Bennu was part of a creation myth where the primeval waters were separated from dry land, to make a place for human kind to live. If you are in a place where things are not going well for you, one option is to seek dry land, a place free from worries and tears. This can be a place for you to spend time, like in a place of worship or a public park, or it can be a place for you to live. Whatever you choose to do, make the God of your understanding part of your quest for a safe place. Prayerfully ask for guidance and allow your God to show you what to do next.

16 Udjat and 23 HeruWer

Udjat

Udjat

HeruWer, the elder of the gods, brings you the glyph Udjat, the eye of Heru or of Re. HeruWer is known for his wisdom, gained through much experience over a long life. What he has seen and comprehended can be shared with the younger generations to help them avoid pitfalls and to take advantage of opportunities they did not recognize were available to them. If you are needing such help, ask the God of your understanding to give you an intuition to help you understand what you need to do. If you are the elder, take time to share your wisdom with others. No matter their age, your wisdom can help them attain the knowledge they seek.

23 Nesu Bit and 56 Ausar (Osiris)

Nesu Bit - Pharaoh

Nesu Bit – Pharaoh

Nesu Bit is the hieroglyph for the pharaoh, who is Egypt in one person. This position was created in the mythology by Ausar, the first of the pharaohs. Ausar not only invented agriculture and animal husbandry, he also created the arts of civilization itself. Being such an advanced ruler, makes him a hard act to follow. Ausar tells you that you also have an office. If you are not working at a job or a career, perhaps you are a home-maker or you take care of an elder in your family. Every job is important in the bigger picture, as all come together to create a great city or country. Whatever it is that you do, whether for a living or for charitable purposes, Ausar encourages you by letting you know that you, like he, have all the skills and talents you need to accomplish your purposes and goals.

42 Ptah and 54 Serket

Ptah

Ptah

Ptah, the Ancient Egyptian god of craftsmanship, joins with Serket, the goddess of healing and childbirth, to tell you that every craftsman will need help from another at some point in time. If you have created something, and it is not working right, you may need to “fix” either the design or the individual piece. Sometimes this help has to take the form of divine guidance, as you have tried everything humanly possible to get it right. So, instead of resting on your reputation as an excellent craftsman, ask the God of your understanding for inspiration and collaboration. When God’s hand is on your work, it cannot fail.

36 Khnum and 38 Hapi

Khnum

Khnum

Two Ancient Egyptian gods greet you with a message. Khnum, the ram-headed potter, and Hapi, the personification of the Nile River, combine to tell you that water, meaning flexibility, is essential in everything you do. Khnum takes the dry clay which is like dust and mixes it with water in order to make a pot or jar. While it is still moist, the design and shape can be changed. Once it is fired, the pot becomes hard and can be brittle. If you are in the process of making changes in your life (and who isn’t?) – you must be like the moldable clay, so that you can change to be your best.

19 Shenu and 42 Ptah

Ptah

Ptah

Ptah, the Ancient Egyptian god of builders and architects, brings you the hieroglyph Shenu, a symbol for eternity. When Ptah created the city of MenNefer (Memphis), he did so for eternity. The remains of this city are near Cairo and many of the buildings in Cairo have stones “quarried” from MenNefer to use as building materials. Ptah counsels you that you too are building for eternity. Your actions and words are recorded and will last far longer than you can imagine. When you plan ahead, and build carefully, you will be proud of what you have built.